Three bold predictions for the 2022 season

Lewis Hamilton, Formula 1

Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes, Formula 1 (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

Entering the new era of Formula 1 with complete unpredictability, what potential season-shaping moments are on their way?

With a so-called “clean sheet of paper” handed to each and every Formula 1 manufacturer, a complete lack of knowledge of the new aerodynamic regulations, and claimed power unit improvements across the grid, the 2022 campaign could be the single best season in terms of parity in the history of the sport.

Wiping the slate aerodynamically for all teams, there will be an extensive learning curve associated with the understanding of the new machines that could cause constant shifts in the balance of power between powerhouse manufacturers. This is the perfect platform for seeing numerous drivers set foot on the podium and display their true talent over the course of the season.

Despite the only significant change in power unit regulations being the switch to a more sustainable race fuel, there seems to be a battle brewing among manufacturers which could not just bring the field relatively level on power, but also form distinct positives and negatives to each.

From Renault’s switch to a split-turbo layout to Ferrari’s claims of performance gains in their power unit with an already improved electrical powertrain, more of the field seem to be catching up to the long-standing kings-of-power in Mercedes.

At the very least, a 2012-esque title fight between numerous constructors and drivers seems to be on the cards for Formula 1 fans. Many rightfully touted 2021 as the best season to date in Formula 1 thanks to a historical one-on-one rivalry, but 2022 could offer a unique level of parity rarely seen in Formula 1.

With that being said, which drivers can grab the headlines (for good or bad) and offer some of the most memorable highlights of the season? Here are three bold predictions for the 2022 season.


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